July, 2017

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31st July 2017 – Registry System Testing (RST) Site Live

Over the years, several technical testing procedures have been developed to support registry services. Previously, all registry-related technical tests were referred to as Pre-Delegation Testing (PDT). To more accurately reflect the portfolio of registry test services performed for delegated top-level domains, these services will now be collectively referred to as Registry System Testing (RST), which includes Pre-Delegation Testing.

The published information can now be accessed at https://www.icann.org/resources/registry-system-testing.

Effective Date of the Approved Amendment to the Base New gTLD Registry Agreement

LOS ANGELES – 31 July 2017 – As of today, the 2017 Global Amendment to the base New gTLD Registry Agreement is effective. This follows a 60-day notice provided by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) organization to all affected registry operators on 01 June 2017 and announced here to the community. The 2017 Global Amendment [PDF, 669 KB] was approved by eligible registry operators and the ICANN Board according to the terms of the contract.

For additional reference materials and details of the process, please visit ICANN's Global Amendment webpage as well as the Registry Agreements webpage.

15 Successful Candidates Have Been Selected for NextGen@ICANN60

LOS ANGELES - 31 July 2017 - Fifteen individuals from various universities in the Asia-Pacific region have been selected to participate and engage with ICANN community members during ICANN60 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.

These individuals are all currently engaged in studies that encompass the fields of computer science, technology management, law, and electrical engineering. Five additional selectees who attended a previous ICANN meeting as NextGenners will now serve as ambassadors for these newcomers.

Individuals were assessed by an independent selection committee after submitting an online application and meeting the initial program requirements.

The successful candidates were selected based on their current studies and interest in the work currently being done in the Internet ecosystem in relation to global policy and Internet governance.

The candidates selected to participate at ICANN60 include:

Ali Hussain University of Malaya
Ali Rahmanpour Iran University of Science and Technology
Ani Mkrtchyan Public Administration Academy Republic of Armenia
Anum Farooq Janjua National University of Sciences and Technology
Melchizedek Ibarrientos Alipio University of the Philippines Diliman
Benjz Gerard Magtibay Sevilla Ateneo de Manila University
Dong Gi Lee Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
Francis Nwokelo University of Nigeria, Nsukka
Hamideh Shahrabi Farahani Shahid Beheshti University
Heather Catherine Costelloe Murdoch University, School of Law
Muhammad Adan Abid National University of Computer &Emerging Sciences
Padma Venkataraman National Law University, Delhi
Prateek Dewan Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology
Razoana Moslam Sydney Institute, Australia
Sophie Alice Hey University of Tasmania
Program Ambassador Jacqueline Anita Eggenschewiler ICANN58
Program Ambassador Matthias Markus Hudobnik ICANN58
Program Ambassador Mohammad Abdul Awal ICANN57
Program Ambassador Olga Kyryliuk ICANN58
Program Ambassador Oyewole Simon Oginni ICANN55

Click here for more information on the NextGen program.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

Introducing ICANN’s Chief Data Protection Officer (CDPO)

Data protection and privacy laws and regulations are constantly evolving. One of the ICANN organization’s top priorities continues to be data protection and privacy compliance and maintaining the security of personal data we collect in the course of our operations. As part of the ICANN organization’s overall data protection and privacy governance framework, we are creating a new role: the Chief Data Protection Officer (CDPO).

We have asked Daniel Halloran to be ICANN’s Chief Data Protection Officer. Dan will take on this role, in addition to his current responsibilities as Deputy General Counsel. Dan has been deeply involved in our efforts surrounding data privacy and protection, and he will be an excellent fit for this new role. Dan will continue to report to me in both roles.

The CDPO will focus on ICANN organization-level data, to ensure ICANN’s internal data protection and privacy program is compliant and up to date. While this is a new role within the ICANN organization, it’s by no means a new type of position. Many similar-sized organizations that collect and retain personal data also have a CDPO (or similarly named ‘chief privacy officer’).

The CDPO will also advise the ICANN organization on how to best handle and process personal information we collect, as we continue to fulfill our core commitments and obligations and provide both internal and external services in a compliant manner.

This position allows us to be even more responsive to changes in data privacy regulations, working closely with our internal teams to ensure our personal data processing activities are in line with our overall data protection and privacy framework. In this role, Dan will conduct regular reviews and risk assessments to ensure our organizational actions remain in compliance with applicable laws, regulations and internal policies.

The organization-level role is not intended to cover the use of data by Registrars and Registries under ICANN’s contracts, which is part of the broader discussion relating to the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (Regulation (EU) 2016/679) and the impact of these regulations on ICANN contracts, which is a discussion taking place in broader ICANN community discussions.

Creating this new position is an important step, and supplements other ongoing processes we’re undertaking in regards to data privacy. To get an idea of the other related projects being worked on, please visit https://www.icann.org/dataprotectionprivacy.

ICANN Seeking Mentor for Global Indigenous Ambassador Program

LOS ANGELES – 27 July 2017 - Today, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced a call for a volunteer to serve as a mentor for the Global Indigenous Ambassador Program.

ICANN announced the creation of the Global Indigenous Ambassador Program in June 2017. The program establishes two Indigenous Ambassadors, which will be selected from underrepresented indigenous communities. Through the inclusion of a broader and more diverse base of knowledgeable constituents, ICANN will be better equipped to support the next generation of the global Internet community.

ICANN is now accepting applications for anyone interested in serving as a mentor for the two Global Indigenous Ambassadors. Mentors must be familiar with ICANN and At-Large, and have been active in one of the constituencies. Mentors must also meet a number of criteria, which are listed on this webpage, as well as follow all of the requirements for coaches as described in the ICANN Fellowship Program's handbook for coaches.

The selected mentor will receive travel and hotel accommodations, as well as a per diem, for ICANN60 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, which will be held from 28 October – 3 November 2017.

The deadline for submitting an application is 31 July 2017. Applications are available here.

ICANN encourages anyone who is qualified to apply for this special opportunity!

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

The Fellowship Spirit

On 25 June 2017, ICANN59 Fellowship Alumni gathered in Johannesburg, South Africa, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the program.


Finale of a Four-Part Blog Series (Read Part One, Part Two, and Part Three)

Laughter, song, and conversation filled the air on a Sunday night in Johannesburg when over 100 Program Alumni and other members of ICANN's community, Board, and organization gathered to celebrate 10 successful years of the Fellowship Program at ICANN. As we look forward, it's time to act on the key outcomes and action items garnered from the Fellowship Survey. Our focus will be on bringing even more diversity to the ICANN community by identifying the gaps existing in our multistakeholder model related to regions, sector, gender, professional services, and underserved communities.

But it's more than just filling seats. We need volunteers who can advance ICANN's work. Who are these special individuals? They are experts in their fields and understand their community, regional needs, and challenges. They share a passion for continued improvements in the Internet governance space in matters related to policy, technical, and security – within ICANN's remit. Perhaps most importantly, they'll understand the hard work that lies ahead – and will still want to be part of the solution.

A key piece of attracting and retaining volunteers is onboarding, mentoring, and coaching them – a focus of the last four years of the Fellowship Program. We've matched experienced Fellowship Alumni with participants who are new to the program, and sometimes, new to the ICANN space. They work in teams for six weeks before a meeting, receive guidance at the meeting, and follow up and support each other after the meeting. And it's working – we've seen a definite increase in the number of individuals who join, stay, and actively engage in ICANN's communities, working groups, or review teams.

As we conclude this four-part series celebrating the real spirit that is the Fellowship Program, we'd like to highlight Fellowship Alumni who have gone on to join the ICANN organization, supporting the work of the ICANN community.

  • Mario Aleman (2014/ICANN49 Fellow) – Secretariat Operations Coordinator, Policy Development Support
  • Yaovi Atohoun (2009/ICANN36 Fellow) – Stakeholder Engagement and Operations Manager, Africa
  • Fahd Batayneh (2008/ ICANN32 Fellow) – Stakeholder Engagement Manager, Middle East
  • Albert Daniels (2007/ICANN29 Fellow) – Stakeholder Engagement Senior Manager, Caribbean
  • Amr Elsadr (2009/ICANN36 Fellow) – Policy Manager, Policy Development Support
  • Sarmad Hussain (2008/ICANN31 Fellow) – IDN Programs Director
  • Rodrigo de la Parra (2007/ICANN29 Fellow) – VP, Global Stakeholder Engagement, Latin America and Caribbean / Managing Director for Montevideo, serving the Latin American and Caribbean region
  • Rodrigo Saucedo Linares (2010/ICANN37 Fellow) – Strategic Initiatives – Latin America and Caribbean Senior Manager
  • Siranush Vardanyan (2008/ICANN31 Fellow) – Fellowship Program Manager, Public Responsibility Support

If you'd like information about how to apply to the Fellowship Program or have any feedback or comments, please email us at fellowships@icann.org.

Successful Candidates Announced for ICANN60 Fellowship

LOS ANGELES – 21July 2017 - ICANN announces 60 individuals from 50 countries selected to participate in ICANN's Fellowship program at the 60th Public Meeting in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, from 28 October - 3 November 2017.

These successful candidates represent all sectors of society including; civil, government, ccTLD operations, academia, business community, technical, security, and end user groups.

The Fellowship program seeks to create a broader and more diverse base of knowledgeable constituents with priority given to candidates currently living in underserved and underrepresented communities around the world, those who represent diversity of gender, sector, region, experience, expertise, and/or have established financial need. An independent selection committee assessed the 512 Fellowship applications received for this meeting.

Click this link to see the list of selected candidates and learn more about the Fellowship program.

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

Nominations for ARIN Elections Now Open

As of 17 July 2017, American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) Trustees and representatives from ARIN's General Members in Good Standing are invited to nominate candidates for seats on the Board of Trustees and Advisory Council to serve three-year terms beginning 1 January 2018. Self-nominations are welcome. Visit the ARIN website to view the initial requirements and responsibilities of the Board of Trustees and Advisory Council.

This year, the ARIN Board of Trustees will appoint a third representative from a community-developed pool of nominees to serve as a representative from the ARIN region on the Address Supporting Organization Address Council (ASO AC)/Number Resource Organization Number Council (NRO NC). Nominations will be accepted from any individual, regardless of ARIN Membership status, and may include a self-nomination or multiple nominations for one or more candidate(s).

For questions about ARIN Elections, visit ARIN's Election Headquarters or email members@arin.net.

Personal Data “Use” Matrix Now Available for Public Review

This is our third in a series of blogs (read part one and part two) on the progress we have made related to data privacy and protection regulations, notably on the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which will take full effect on 25 May 2018.

In our last update, we noted that an ad hoc volunteer group was formed to help us create and populate a matrix of user stories of the personal data the ICANN organization's contracted parties collect, transmit, or publish in relation to our contracts with registries and registrars. The purpose for collecting this data is to inform a legal analysis on the potential impact of the GDPR from a contractual perspective, which is an activity that we expect to begin in September.

Thanks to the hard work of this group, along with the many other community members who contributed to this effort, we now have most of this information and have published the first draft of the matrix of user stories.

We are posting the matrix for a 30-day public review period. Given the importance of ensuring the data is as complete as possible, we encourage you to review the matrix and let us know if you are aware of something that should be included. We will be updating the matrix during the review period as more data becomes available.

Gathering this information was an extensive undertaking, particularly given the aggressive schedule the group set to complete this activity. We sincerely thank everyone for their hard work and contributions to this important effort.

Following the 30-day review period, we will consolidate the data into a condensed and more easily readable format. We expect to complete this activity by early September. Once the analysis is complete, we will use this data, when appropriate, in our discussions with data protection agencies and other relevant parties. Concurrently, we will move forward with the legal analysis.

We are moving quickly through this process and we will provide you with regular updates. You can also visit the data privacy/protection page on icann.org for information that includes our blogs, details of the matrix, community initiatives, useful links and more. If you have specific questions or have content to contribute to the matrix, please reach out to us directly or email globalsupport@icann.org with "GDPR Matrix" in the subject line.

In closing, we want to once again express our appreciation to all of you who contributed to this data-gathering effort.

ICANN Publishes Findings of ICANN59 Community Feedback and By the Numbers Reports

24 July 2017 – LOS ANGELES – Today, ICANN published the results of the ICANN59 participant survey, and the technical, demographic, and attendance statistics. There are two reports – the Community Feedback report and the By the Numbers report. These reports summarize our findings from ICANN's second Public Forum Meeting of the new meeting strategy. These reports are part of ICANN's commitment to transparency.

By the Numbers Report highlights include:

  • 1,353 checked-in participants, with 498 listing their region as Africa
  • 33% of attendees participating for the first time
  • 236 sessions held, for a total of 423 hours
  • Top three sessions by attendance:
    1. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and its Potential Impact: Looking for Practical Solutions
    2. Cross-Community Discussion on Next-Generation gTLD Registration Directory Services (RDS) Policy Requirements
    3. Who Sets ICANN's Priorities?
  • 39,729 schedule website page views
  • 8.2 terabytes of data as network traffic

Our goal is to improve on the feedback and statistics we collect, and to look for trends by comparing meeting data over time. Learning about trends gives us greater insights into how we are meeting the needs of attendees, and informs the kinds of changes we need to make.

Click on this link to download the full ICANN59 Community Feedback report [PDF, 734 KB].

Click here to download the full ICANN59 By the Numbers report [PDF, 6.06 MB].

If you have questions, please email: meetings@icann.org

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

     

Meet the NextGen from ICANN59

The NextGen experience at ICANN59 will be a lasting memory for all who were involved. After the meeting was over, the NextGen participants took it upon themselves to create a report highlighting their experiences. The meeting gave them a deeper idea of what ICANN is all about. Their individual interactions with the various stakeholders and community members brought to light how the NextGen Program is making a difference in these young people's lives and is helping to shape the future. We hope that before long, the ICANN community will benefit from their involvement.

Six weeks before ICANN59, the program Ambassadors and I prepared the NextGen participants. And once again, when they arrived at the meeting, I was struck by the level of knowledge and enthusiasm that these young adults brought with them. Presentation day gave them a chance to shine! Their topics were intriguing and their presentations were fascinating – and elicited thought-provoking questions from the audience.

In the report, you'll meet the NextGen participants of ICANN59 and experience what they encountered during their week at ICANN59. I think you'll find it an interesting read, and it will help you to understand the program and its importance.

I also invite you to take a look at the ICANN59 NextGen Flickr album put together by Nelson Kwaje, one of this meeting's participants.

If you're interested in learning more about the NextGen Program or becoming a participant in a future meeting, see the ICANN@NextGen webpage.

An Update from the Second Security, Stability and Resiliency of the Domain Name System (DNS) Review Team (SSR2)

Alain Aina, Network Engineer at West and Central African Research and Education Network (ccNSO representative, Africa)


The SSR2 review team recently held a two-day face-to-face meeting in Johannesburg, South Africa, prior to ICANN59. The review team is examining security, operational stability, and resiliency matters related to ICANN's coordination of the Internet's system of unique identifiers. Here, review team member Alain Aina explains why the SSR2 Review is important and shares some highlights from the recent meeting.

Why is the SSR2 Review important?

The unique identifiers system is critical to the Internet. ICANN, in its role as the technical coordinator of these unique identifiers, is a key component of this system. The ICANN organization works with the global Internet community to meet its commitments. This work requires some operational elements as well as coordination and engagement with several parties.

The SSR2 Review is assessing how well ICANN is executing its commitment to enhance the operational stability, reliability, resiliency, security, and global interoperability of the Internet's system of unique identifiers. The SSR2 Review will evaluate how well ICANN performs its role, as well as how well the ecosystem is prepared to deal with known and future threats inherent to the normal evolution of the Internet and the unique identifiers system.

What are some of the areas the review team is currently focusing on?

During the meeting in Johannesburg, we finalized five key areas that the review will focus on. Sub-teams of volunteers from within the team will review:

  1. ICANN's implementation of community recommendations from the first SSR Review (SSR1). Learn more.
  2. The completeness and effectiveness of ICANN's internal SSR processes. Learn more.
  3. ICANN activities that impact the security and stability of the DNS. Learn more.
  4. ICANN's strategy to address potential future challenges to the secure and resilient operation of the unique identifiers systems it coordinates. Learn more.
  5. The impact of the IANA stewardship transition on the security of ICANN and the unique identifier systems it coordinates. Learn more.

In addition, "rapporteurs" for each of the sub-teams were determined during the meeting. Rapporteurs are responsible for sharing updates on the team's progress during the weekly review team meetings.

In your opinion, what were some of the major achievements of this meeting?

It was great to finalize our key areas of focus. During the meeting we had a number of breakout sessions which allowed each of the sub-groups to meet to develop their scope and begin working together.

What are the next steps for the review team?

The sub-groups will work to finalize their scope and work plans. The full review team will also continue fact-finding and assembling materials to help inform the review. We will then be able to bring our findings together and consult with the ICANN community for its input.

Is there anything else you'd like to highlight from the meeting?

The commitment from my fellow SSR2 team members throughout the meeting in Johannesburg and others has been great. I also want to highlight the commitment and efficiency of ICANN's support staff, which helps the review team make progress on our work.

How can people get involved in the SSR2 Review?

You can follow the review team meetings live and stay informed of its progress by becoming an SSR2 observer. You can also share your expertise and input on SSR issues by sending an email to input-to-ssr2rt@icann.org.

To learn more about the Review, visit the SSR2 wiki page.

New gTLDs -Competition, Consumer Trust and Consumer Choice Review Team: ICANN 59 Update & Next Steps

The Competition, Consumer Trust and Consumer Choice Review Team (CCTRT) held two days of face-to-face meetings during ICANN59 in Johannesburg. The team met with a subset of the ICANN Board and a number of ICANN stakeholder groups to deliver updates on the Review Team's current progress and reaction to public comments received on their draft report.

What were the Three Major Achievements of this Meeting?

The Review Team:

  1. Analyzed the results of the Domain Name System (DNS) Abuse Intermediate Report following a presentation by the report's authors, which will be incorporated into a dedicated new section of the CCT-RT report, as appropriate.
  2. Agreed to issue any new sections of the report for public comment.
  3. Developed and reached consensus on a methodology to update the draft report.

Key Findings of the DNS Abuse Study Intermediate Report Presented to the CCT-RT at ICANN59

  • Abuse counts—or absolute number of abused domains—show relatively constant levels of technical abuse in legacy gTLDs and an upward trend of abuse in new gTLDs. This includes malware hosting, botnet command and control, high volume spam, and phishing.
  • With some exceptions and spikes, overall abuse rates in new gTLDs, which are based on an “abused domains per 10,000" ratio, tend to be lower than in legacy gTLDs. Abuse rate trends in new and legacy gTLDs appear to be converging to similar levels by the end of 2016, which suggests that cybercriminals may be migrating to new gTLDs.
  • Spam rates in new gTLDs surpassed spam rates in legacy gTLDs in mid-2015 and continue to rise. Spam rates in legacy gTLDs have remained relatively stable.
  • Privacy and proxy service-associated domains do not appear to correlate with abnormally high levels of abuse.
  • Based on registrar location, the United States and China tend to be associated with the highest absolute amounts of abuse. This is due in part to the fact that more registrars are headquartered in those countries. When the rate of abuse is calculated, Gibraltar takes a disproportionately high place in the rankings.

The final version of the DNS Abuse Study is scheduled to be delivered in early August 2017.

What are next steps for the Review Team?

The CCT-RT will:

  1. Update the draft report, as appropriate, in light of public comments received. Significant progress was made at ICANN59 to refine the draft recommendations and detail its rationales and success measures.
  2. Work on building new sections of the report that incorporate results of the DNS Abuse Study, as appropriate. The Review Team plans to issue these new sections of its report for public comment in August 2017.

The CCT-RT aims to send its final report to the ICANN Board of Directors prior to ICANN60.

Evolving Data Privacy and Protection Regulations – UPDATE

We first shared information on the ICANN organization's activities relating to the data privacy and protection regulations prior to ICANN59 in a blog post titled "Dialogues on the Evolving Data Privacy and Protection Regulations." We'd like to take this opportunity to provide an update on developments that occurred during the meeting.

While in Johannesburg, the community had a series of discussions and sessions regarding data protection and privacy, including a session on "GDPR and its potential: looking for practical solutions." You can access the presentation and a transcript here. This session was a moderated discussion on the following topics:

  1. An introduction on the GDPR and its impact on businesses.
  2. How the GDPR affects registrants and services by registries and registrars, as well as the search for practical solutions.
  3. The potential impact on current ICANN-related work.

In addition to the community's sessions, and in relation to the dialogues with ICANN's contracted parties, an informal volunteer group was established. This group will assist in populating a matrix on the use of specific data fields in our contracts for the purposes of assessing the potential impact of the GDPR on ICANN's contracts with the registries and registrars.

This effort requires input from all pertinent parties, to ensure we are not missing critical information. To that end, members of the ad hoc group are being asked to provide their input by 15 July 2017, with the objective of putting this out for public review for 30 days shortly thereafter.

The eventual goal is to provide a comprehensive set of data including how it is used, in order to inform legal analysis, as well as to engage with data protection authorities for additional guidance or support.

The ICANN organization will continue to engage with the European community (including the European Union Article 29 Working Party), data protection agencies, and other pertinent stakeholders to gain a better understanding of the relevant aspects of GDPR and how it relates to ICANN's work and the organization's contracts with registries and registrars.

ICANN is committed to understanding the implications of evolving data protection and privacy regulations on areas within ICANN's remit. We appreciate that the GDPR may affect the ICANN organization and the domain name ecosystems in at least two areas, including personal data that participants in the domain name ecosystem collect, display, and process, including registries and registrars pursuant to ICANN contracts, and personal data that ICANN collects and processes for internal or external services.

The ICANN organization's work in this area does not replace existing policy development work, including that of the Registry Directory Service (RDS) group.

Lastly, we want to assure you that the ICANN organization will continue to work within our mission and scope and remain transparent as we work with each group to seek practical solutions, whether it affects the European realm or other jurisdictions and so that we can remain proactive where there is dialogue centered around data protection.

There will be more updates on this subject over the next few weeks and months, and we will continue to keep everyone apprised on the situation and what we're facilitating regarding GDPR. Meanwhile, we invite you to visit the new Data Protection/Privacy Issues landing page on ICANN.org

A “Key” Milestone in Protecting the DNS

A significant milestone has been reached in ICANN’s ongoing effort to change the cryptographic key that helps protect the Domain Name System (DNS).

On 11 July 2017, the new DNSSEC Key Signing Key (KSK-2017) appeared in the DNS, marking the first time a new key has been generated since 2010, when the first key (KSK-2010) was generated.

The generation of this new key is the result of a great deal of planning and outreach to assure that network operators are ready for the “key roll” on 11 October 2017, when the new key will be put to use.

This effort to change the keys began with a community design team, which met from March 2015 to October 2016. The team’s recommendations were posted on March 2016. Based upon those recommendations, ICANN’s final plans were posted a few months later (July 2016).

For more than a year, the ICANN organization has engaged in a comprehensive outreach campaign to help prepare the industry for the October rollover from KSK-2010 to KSK-2017. This campaign is ongoing, with our efforts increasing as the rollover date approaches.

The organization has also requested that government regulators across the globe assist in making certain that network operators in their respective countries are ready for the key roll.

For details on the KSK rollover project, please visit our dedicated Root Zone KSK Rollover webpage.

Fifth Africa DNS Forum to Take Place in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

The fifth Africa Domain Name System (DNS) Forum is being organized by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), in partnership with the Internet Society (ISOC) and the Africa Top Level Domains Organization (AFTLD). The forum, which is being hosted by the Tanzania Network Information Centre (tzNIC), will take place in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from 26-28 July 2017. This year's theme will be "Taking Stock of the Africa DNS Industry and Planning Ahead."

The forum comes on the heels of the recently released Africa DNS Market Report, the first of its kind in the region, which provides a detailed analysis of the DNS market for 54 countries. As such, one of the highlights of the forum will be a session dedicated to discussing the report and determining the key outcomes and next steps. Other topics to be covered during panel discussions will include securing the African DNS, legal issues affecting African registries, registrars and resellers, IPv6 deployment, and emerging trends in the DNS industry.

The objective of this annual event is to bring together interested parties from Africa and world experts in the field to share experiences and update the audience on new developments in the domain industry on both a global and regional level.

This year's forum follows on success of the preceding forums, which were held in Durban, South Africa (2013), Abuja, Nigeria (2014), Nairobi, Kenya (2015) and Marrakech, Morocco (2016). By holding the forum in different parts of Africa, ICANN aims to provide equal opportunities to regional stakeholders, inform the continent's different communities about the domain industry and engage with attendees on how best to strengthen Africa's digital presence.

ICANN supports the development of a stronger and more dynamic regional domain industry, and we look forward to this fifth edition of the Africa DNS Forum.

You can register here for the event and visit the Africa DNS Forum website for more information.

A livestream of the event will be available here.

Media Contacts:

Luna Madi
Communications Director, EMEA
Istanbul, Turkey
Tel: +90 533 0313505
Email: luna.madi@icann.org

Buket Coskuner
Global Communications Coordinator, EMEA
Istanbul, Turkey
Tel: +90 533 4876254
Email: buket.coskuner@icann.org

About ICANN:

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address into your computer or other device – a name or a number. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation and a community with participants from all over the world.

For more information, please visit: https://www.icann.org/

Extended Deadline: Request for Proposal for the RSSAC Organizational Review

The deadline has been extended for the Request for Proposal for the Independent Review of the Root Server System Advisory Committee (RSSAC). The new deadline is 24 July 2017 at 12:00 PDT.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is seeking a provider to conduct an independent assessment of the Root Server System Advisory Committee (RSSAC). The provider should have technical knowledge in domain name or Internet server operations, or have experience working with the RSSAC or Root Server Operators. The provider should also have an understanding of the root server ecosystem and/or DNS protocol knowledge.

The objective of this Request for Proposal (RFP) is to identify an independent examiner that can conduct a comprehensive assessment of RSSAC. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • The continued purpose of RSSAC within the ICANN structure;
  • How effectively RSSAC fulfills its purpose;
  • Whether any change in structure or operations is needed; and
  • The extent to which RSSAC as a whole is accountable to the wider ICANN community.

The review is scheduled to take place from September 2017 through June 2018. For a complete overview and timeline for the RFP, please see here [PDF 642 KB].

Indications of interest are to be received by emailing RSSACReview-RFP@icann.org. Proposals should be electronically submitted by 23:59 PDT on 10 July 2017 using ICANN's sourcing tool, access to which may be requested via the same email address as above.

Background

According to the ICANN Bylaws, the role of the Root Server System Advisory Committee ("Root Server System Advisory Committee" or "RSSAC") is to advise the ICANN community and Board on matters relating to the operation, administration, security, and integrity of the Internet's Root Server System. It shall have the following responsibilities:

  1. Communicate on matters relating to the operation of the Root Servers and their multiple instances with the Internet technical community and the ICANN community. The RSSAC shall gather and articulate requirements to offer to those engaged in technical revision of the protocols and best common practices related to the operation of DNS servers.
  2. Communicate on matters relating to the administration of the Root Zone with those who have direct responsibility for that administration. These matters include the processes and procedures for the production of the Root Zone File.
  3. Engage in ongoing threat assessment and risk analysis of the Root Server System and recommend any necessary audit activity to assess the current status of root servers and the root zone.
  4. Respond to requests for information or opinions from the Board.
  5. Report periodically to the Board on its activities.
  6. Make policy recommendations to the ICANN community and Board.

3 Types of Software to Help Optimize Your Organization in the Cloud

The talk about moving your business to the cloud isn’t new: this has always been the go-to solution for enterprises and corporations. However, small businesses still remained shy to the implementation. Until recently. Stats are showing that by 2020, 78% of SMBs in the US will have fully adopted cloud computing (source: Forbes).

Advantage of the Cloud

According to an article by SalesForce, top advantages of the Cloud include flexibility, disaster recovery, automatic software updates, ability to work from anywhere, increased collaboration, capital-expenditure free, environment friendliness, security, document control, and speed.

Which means nothing can stop organizations from adopting the trends. But there’s more to it. Implementing a change or an upgrade to the system should enforce the overall optimization and performance of the products, services, and interactions involved. Which is why it’s imperative to focus on these three major types of software for the Cloud: contract database software, collaboration software, and security & network tools.

Contract Database Software

Contract management solutions are essential to any business, especially those considering moving to the cloud. There have been many speculations stating that the Cloud isn’t a secure environment for contract management, or that manual processes are more effective. Even often stated that contract management tasks in the Cloud take too much time to be completed (source: ContractWorks). These are all myths, as Cloud solutions have become better, safer and faster across the years. And your organization can benefit from all these positive aspects, and optimize departments such as HR, Sales, Legal, Accounting.

 

Examples of contract database software include Agiloft, Intuit QuickBooks, SurePayroll, Xpenditure expense tracking, and more.

Collaboration Software

Project management and collaboration environments have become crucial for the efficacy and workflow productivity of companies that have remote employees and offer international services or products. To save time, optimize the workflow processes and deliver excellent results while maintaining a healthy team dynamic. To do this, your organization could benefit from a series of software and tools specifically addressed to the Cloud.

 

Examples of collaboration tools (affordable even for small businesses) in the Cloud include Asana, Trello, Citrix Grasshopper, ClickMeeting, MailChimp, Sprout Social, Hootsuite, Zoho.

Security and Network Software

Over 1.8 Billion data records were lost in January 2017 alone, according to BreachLevelIndex. And over 1.6% of data breaches happen in the Technology industry, while over 90% target the Government. The majority of data breaches take place in the US, a report from the same authority shows. This means “security and network” is a sensitive topic. If you’re moving your business to the Cloud, there are tools that ensure your contracts, clients, services, products, and processes are safe from harm.

 

Examples include Spiceworks Network Monitor, WebrootSecureAnywhereAntiVirus, BitdefenderAntiVirus Plus.

 

Of course, the list doesn’t stop here. For organizations that can afford to invest in other cloud-based solutions, other types of software to focus on can be CRM solutions, SEO and Content Generation tools. A complete list of tools and software from PCMag is available here, with explanations and prices. Based on your organization’s activities and needs, you can select the best options to optimize both internal and external processes.

 

Image source: Pixabay

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Request for Proposal: SSAC Organizational Review

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) is seeking a provider to conduct an independent assessment of the Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC).

The provider should have technical knowledge or experience with security matters with the Internet technical community and the operators and managers of critical DNS infrastructure services; demonstrate an understanding of the SSAC's charter and its Operational Procedures [PDF, 420 KB]; demonstrate knowledge of the technical areas covered by the SSAC's charter, including security and integrity of the Internet's naming and address allocation systems.

The objective of this Request for Proposal (RFP) is to identify an independent examiner that can conduct a comprehensive assessment of SSAC. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • An assessment of the implementation state of SSAC's prior review;
  • An assessment of whether SSAC has a continuing purpose within the ICANN structure;
  • An assessment of how effectively SSAC fulfills its purpose and whether any change in structure or operations is needed to improve effectiveness; and
  • An assessment of the extent to which SSAC as a whole is accountable to the wider ICANN community.

The review is scheduled to take place from October 2017 through July 2018. For a complete overview and timeline for the RFP, please see here [PDF, 608 KB]

Indications of interest are to be received by emailing SSACReview-RFP@icann.org. Proposals should be electronically submitted by 23:59 PDT on 4 August 2017 using ICANN's sourcing tool, access to which may be requested via the same email address as above.

Background

According to the ICANN Bylaws, the role of the Security and Stability Advisory Committee ("Security and Stability Advisory Committee" or "SSAC") is to advise the ICANN community and Board on matters relating to the security and integrity of the Internet's naming and address allocation systems. It shall have the following responsibilities:

  1. To communicate on security matters with the Internet technical community and the operators and managers of critical DNS infrastructure services, to include the root name server operator community, the top-level domain registries and registrars, the operators of the reverse delegation trees such as in-addr.arpa and ip6.arpa, and others as events and developments dictate. The SSAC shall gather and articulate requirements to offer to those engaged in technical revision of the protocols related to DNS and address allocation and those engaged in operations planning.
  2. To engage in ongoing threat assessment and risk analysis of the Internet naming and address allocation services to assess where the principal threats to stability and security lie, and to advise the ICANN community accordingly. The SSAC shall recommend any necessary audit activity to assess the current status of DNS and address allocation security in relation to identified risks and threats.
  3. To communicate with those who have direct responsibility for Internet naming and address allocation security matters (IETF, RSSAC (as defined in Section 12.2(c)(i)), RIRs, name registries, etc.), to ensure that its advice on security risks, issues, and priorities is properly synchronized with existing standardization, deployment, operational, and coordination activities. The SSAC shall monitor these activities and inform the ICANN community and Board on their progress, as appropriate.
  4. To report periodically to the Board on its activities.
  5. To make policy recommendations to the ICANN community and Board.

New Contracting Statistics Released

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