July, 2018

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ICANN Publishes ICANN62 By the Numbers Report

LOS ANGELES – 31 July 2018 – Today, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) published the ICANN62 By the Numbers report, which includes technical, demographic, and attendance statistics. The report summarizes the findings from ICANN's third Policy Forum of the current meeting strategy. The report is part of ICANN's commitment to transparency.

ICANN62 By the Numbers Report highlights include:

  • 1,113 checked-in participants, with 303 listing their region as Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • 22% of attendees participated for the first time.
  • 247 sessions were held for a total of 416 hours.
  • 543 attendees logged into the schedule website and mobile platform.
  • 10,465 gigabytes of data as network traffic.
  • 9% of network traffic was IPv6 (-5% decrease from ICANN61 in San Juan, Puerto Rico).

The goal is to improve on the statistics collected, and to look for trends by comparing meeting data over time. Learning about trends gives the ICANN organization greater insight into how to meet the needs of attendees, and informs the kinds of changes that need to be made.

Click here to download the full ICANN62 by the Numbers Report [PDF, 11.8 MB].

Please send any questions to: meetings@icann.org

Draft ICANN Africa Strategic Plan 2016-2020 Version 3.0

Open Date: 30 July 2018 Close Date: 10 September 2018
Originating Organization:

Global Stakeholder Engagement

Categories/Tags: Strategy
Brief Overview:

ICANN organization (org.) is seeking public comments on the draft reviewed ICANN - Africa Strategy FY16-FY20 Ver3.0

Link: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/africa-strategic-plan-2018-07-30-en

ICANN Announces Participants NextGen@ICANN63

LOS ANGELES – 30 July 2018 – Today, The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced the names of the selected candidates for the NextGen program at ICANN63. This meeting will take place in Barcelona, Spain, from 20 to 25 October 2018.

The 12 participants are currently engaged in studies related to the fields of data protection, law, and computer engineering in European universities. Three additional participants who attended previous ICANN public meetings with the NextGen program will now serve as ambassadors for these newcomers.

An independent selection committee assessed the applicants and selected the successful candidates based on their current studies and interest in the Internet ecosystem, global policy, and Internet governance.

The candidates selected as ICANN63 NextGen participants are:

Anastasia Sendrea College of Europe, Bruges
Austin David Ruckstuhl United Nations University CRIS
Christina Kalogeropoulou National Kapodistrian University of Athens
Jan Dohnal Masaryk University
Jana Misic University of Leipzig
João Pedro Damas Martins University of Coimbra
Maria Korniiets Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv
Natalia Dulkowska University of Warsaw
Sabrina Wilkinson Goldsmiths, University of London
Stefan Filipovic University of Belgrade
Teresa Quintel Uppsala University and University of Luxembourg
Ualan Campbell-Smith Oxford Internet Institute

The participants selected as ICANN63 ambassadors are:

Desara Dushi ICANN58
Razoana Moslam ICANN60
Sarah Ingle ICANN61

Click here for more information about the NextGen program<./a>

About ICANN

ICANN’s mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

Accountability Indicators Feedback 1 April – 30 June 2018

Accountability Indicators advanced from beta to v1 in May 2018, further affirming our commitment to continuously improving accountability and transparency. Accountability Indicators is a dynamic and interactive web page that helps you view our progress towards our strategic objectives by exploring various dimensions of our activities.

Every quarter, an update is provided sharing your feedback on Accountability Indicators.

Feedback in FY18 Q4

Last quarter, we received feedback on several topics including requests for:

  • Longer trends in charts
  • Change in the scales used for some indicators
  • More information about the composition of Supporting Organizations and Advisory Committees
  • IPv6 deployment metrics for top-level domains (TLDs)

Next Steps

We are working on presenting longer trends in a range of indicators. We will also review and adjust the scales used to reflect more clearly the differences between periods. Meanwhile, please note that hovering your cursor over a chart will show its values in a tool tip, and right-clicking will bring up a context menu that allows you download the underlying data, a picture of the chart, or share it on social media.

DNSSEC Adoption
DNSSEC Adoption

Reporting on the composition of Supporting Organizations and Advisory Committees is challenging. The ICANN organization supports membership management for the Advisory Committees, but the Supporting Organizations manage memberships themselves. We will seek ways to automate this after the Group Enrollment System has been deployed.

Our recent research into IPv6 support by generic top-level domains (gTLDs) showed almost 100 percent compliance and are planning more research. Our Contractual Compliance team will investigate compliance with IPv6 support requirements if a compliance issue is reported to them.

Quarterly Updates in FY19

We are also changing the reporting schedule of Accountability Indicators. As most of the indicators present quarterly data, going forward we will be updating the Accountability Indicators in July, October, January, and April, after the close of each quarter. Where indicators don't fit this schedule, such as Board and NomCom composition, we'll update the first month after the data is available.

Your Feedback

The feedback you provide on Accountability Indicators is essential to helping us improve the services we provide, as well as the indicators we report with. Please look through the indicators and let us know what you think by clicking the feedback link at the top of each page.

Proposals for Devanagari, Gurmukhi, and Gujarati Scripts’ Root Zone‬ Label Generation Rules

Open Date: 27 July 2018 Close Date: 10 September 2018
Originating Organization: Global Domains Division
Categories/Tags: Top-Level Domains
Brief Overview:

The Neo-Brahmi Script Generation Panel (NBGP) was formed by nine communities that use scripts derived from the Brahmi script. NBGP is developing Root Zone Label Generation Rules (LGR) for Bengali, Devanagari, Gujarati, Gurmukhi, Kannada, Malayalam, Oriya, Tamil and Telugu scripts. The GP intends to publish the proposals for the LGRs of these nine scripts in three sets, releasing proposals for the scripts which share cross-script variant code points together to the extent possible. The first set includes the following: (1) Proposal for the Devanagari Script Label Generation Rules for the Root Zone, (2) Proposal for the Gurmukhi Script Label Generation Rules for the Root Zone, and (3) Proposal for the Gujarati Script Label Generation Rules for the Root Zone. As per the LGR Procedure, these proposals are being posted for public comments to allow those who have not participated in the NBGP to make their views known. Based on the feedback, the NBGP will finalize each proposal for its evaluation and integration into the Label Generation Rules for the Root Zone.

Link: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/devanagari-gurmukhi-gujarati-scripts-lgr-2018-07-27-en

Data Protection/Privacy Update: Key GDPR WHOIS Updates and Next Steps

As our discussions regarding the impact of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) continue to move forward, I want to take this opportunity to thank you for the productive conversations that took place at ICANN62 in Panama City. With this blog, I'd like to take a moment to highlight some areas of work underway and lay out our next steps to seek further clarification of the GDPR in relation to a proposed unified access model [PDF, 93 KB].

In relation to current work, one of the topics that frequently came up during the community's discussions was the process for requesting access to non-public registration data. As noted in the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data (Temp Spec), any requestor with legitimate purpose for access to registration data must contact the relevant registry or registrar, which will then determine how to respond to those requests. As noted in a blog published last week, ICANN's Contractual Compliance department is enforcing the Temp Spec as of 25 May 2018. To report a claim of noncompliance, please submit the appropriate form available on ICANN's Contractual Compliance page (https://www.icann.org/compliance/complaint).

With regards to work underway, exploring options to provide continued access to non-public registration data is at the top of our priorities list as we discuss the next steps. As a reminder, we're still seeking input on the draft discussion document entitled "Framework Elements for a Unified Access Model for Continued Access to Full WHOIS Data [PDF, 93 KB]." I encourage you to review the document and send your feedback to gdpr@icann.org, which will be considered as we continue our work to seek further clarification of the GDPR to develop together a model that complies with the law.

As you may be aware, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) recently provided [PDF, 764 KB] ICANN with useful guidance that may help the community advance its discussions on this important topic. In a recent blog, ICANN General Counsel and Secretary, John Jeffrey, explained how the ICANN org is considering this newly received input. With your input and this clarification, we aim to prepare another iteration of a potential unified access model to gain as much clarity as possible on the GDPR's application to how non-public registration data may be accessed and used. An updated model will be posted in August.

In parallel, the RDAP Pilot Working Group has been making progress in its efforts to define a profile by the end of July to provide the technology platform for access to non-public registration data. Work is also under way on a technology to authenticate access to non-public data, while the current draft unified access model would provide a process for how third parties could access non-public registration data.

Additionally, the Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) has launched an Expedited Policy Development Process (EPDP) to consider whether the Temp Spec ought to be adopted as a consensus policy. Significant progress on the EDPD was made during ICANN62, and I'd like to express my gratitude to the GNSO Council and everyone in the community who has been involved in this process. We look forward to hearing about the EPDP's work in the coming months.

In the coming weeks, we will ask the ICANN Board to consider reaffirming the Temp Spec, as required by the process for adopting temporary policies or specifications. In the meantime, I encourage you to continue moving forward with these important discussions.

Starting in August, as part of our efforts to ensure the continued sharing of information in addition to formal updates made through blogs and other communications, we will also begin having monthly update calls on data protection and privacy issues with ICANN community leadership. These calls will be posted as well.

I invite you to review that report and visit our Data Protection/Privacy page to follow the latest updates on this issue.

The Second Annual ICANN DNS Symposium

The ICANN organization's Office of the Chief Technology Officer (OCTO) organized the second annual ICANN DNS Symposium (IDS), a one-day event focused on all aspects of the Domain Name System (DNS). IDS 2018 was held last Friday, July 13, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and this year's theme was "Attention, Domain Name System: Your 30-year scheduled maintenance is overdue"

Surprising as it may seem, the Domain Name System (DNS) is well into its thirties. The DNS runs remarkably well, and most users think of it as rock solid. But perhaps the system could be made healthier or could be improved to support even further innovation. The program for IDS 2018 explored putting the DNS through a scheduled maintenance with the kind of full diagnostic assessment routinely recommended for high performance vehicles. Members of research, academia, and operational communities shared experiences, data, and innovative thinking on the past, present, and future of the DNS.

The day started with a keynote from Dr. Paul Mockapetris, an Internet pioneer credited with being the inventor of the DNS, entitled "Lessons from history relevant to the future of DNS – principles and examples." Paul told the audience he expected that his list of lessons learned might be somewhat controversial. For example, he mused if the traditional tree structure of the DNS database was under pressure to evolve, and if the DNS engineering community could derive inspiration from many years of developments in the database field.

The rest of the day was filled with a dozen presentations. Some presenters looked back: Ed Lewis revisited and commented on the predictions and observations of an early paper describing the then-current design and operations of DNS. Brian Reid gave a short history of how the BIND name server has evolved along with the DNS protocol. Others focused on the DNS of today: both John Kristoff and Tobias Fiebig described the state of DNS operations dealing with data consistency and reverse DNS, respectively. Still other presentations looked to the future: Ondřej Surý commented on the historic baggage in the DNS protocol resulting from over 30 years of evolution and wondered if certain features should be removed. Jari Arkko asked questions about the level of concentration we now see in the various players in the DNS industry, notably in recursive resolvers. Benno Overeinder described the security features provided by DNS over SSL and wondered if its wider adoption would put pressure on DNSSEC deployment, since there is some overlap in the kind of protections provided by the two protocols.

Included among the various presentations were two panels. The first, entitled "DNS Weaknesses," was led by Dr. Steve Crocker with the panelists commenting on various aspects of DNS protocol and operations that they thought could be improved. The second panel, "DNS over Application Layers", covered the current trend to transport DNS over other protocols, including SSL and HTTPS, and was overseen by Allison Mankin.

We were pleased with a strong turnout of over 120 people filling the hotel ballroom and almost 50 who followed remotely, and gratified by many positive comments afterward, both in person and from our post-event survey. Attendees were impressed with the high quality of the presentations, appreciated the good interaction and discussion among the audience, presenters and panelists, and enjoyed having access to so many DNS experts. We are already looking forward to planning the next IDS, currently scheduled for May 2019 in Asia. We hope to see you there!

Improving APAC Space for a Maturing APAC Community

The largest community turnout in the history of APAC Space was at ICANN60 Annual General Meeting in Abu Dhabi with 100 participants.


Since 2015, APAC Space has steadily grown to become the go-to platform for seasoned ICANN community members and newcomers from the Asia Pacific (APAC) region. We believe that this diversity helps draw people together and spark conversation. APAC Space provides a safe "space" for our community to network and discuss ICANN-related work such as ongoing policy development processes (PDP). In doing so, the platform facilitates increased participation from the APAC community.

Over the past three years, the ICANN APAC team has run 18 APAC Space sessions consisting of face-to-face meetings and web conferences. We now see a steady group of attendees with an average of 30 for web conferences and nearly 50 at face-to-face meetings.

As the APAC community further finds its footing in ICANN's global arena, a key achievement of APAC Space has been to provide more opportunities for our community members to step into leadership roles. The first community facilitator for APAC Space was Edmon Chung, and recently veteran community leaders Holly Raiche and Pam Little have also become community facilitators. We look forward to more community members taking on similar leadership roles for APAC Space.

APAC Space Survey 2018

This year, we ran the second edition of the APAC Space Survey (2018), and received encouraging feedback on our progress so far. In particular, there was a positive response to the rotating interest topics that have kept discussions in APAC Space relevant and community members apprised of ongoing policy developments in ICANN.

We also identified areas for improvement. We will work towards increasing session interactivity by introducing quizzes and allowing more time for quality discussions and questions. We will continue to propose APAC Space topics based on the community's discussion interests as highlighted in the APAC Space Survey. This practice has proven effective as it has allowed us to better plan the appropriate speakers and facilitators in advance. Some top interest areas highlighted by the community include:

  • Enhancing multistakeholder cooperation
  • DNS industry and market developments
  • DNS security, stability, and resiliency
  • Ongoing policy development processes (PDP) such as the Expedited PDP on Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data and New gTLD Subsequent Procedures PDP.

For more details on the survey results, please read the APAC Space Survey 2018 here. [PDF, 177 KB]

Finally, a big thank you to our members for their participation and discussion contributions. We hope that APAC Space will continue to be the premier "space" for the APAC community to gather and comfortably share their views. We ultimately want APAC Space to be the platform that aids better APAC participation in ICANN policymaking. Looking forward, the ICANN64 Community Forum, which will be held in Kobe, Japan in 2019, will be one of the prime opportunities to leverage APAC Space and generate more community-building activities and discussion.

Subscribe to APAC Space discussions at discuss@apacspace.asia, and find out more about APAC Space through our community wiki page.

Recommendations for Managing IDN Variant Top-Level Domains

Open Date: 25 July 2018 Close Date: 3 September 2018
Originating Organization: Global Domains Division
Categories/Tags: Top-Level Domains
Brief Overview:

Recommendations for managing Internationalized Domain Name (IDN) variant labels for top level domains (TLDs) have been developed by ICANN organization. The relevant materials along with these proposed recommendations are being published to seek community feedback.

The community has identified a need for IDN variant TLDs; however, the ICANN Board resolved on 25 September 2010 that "no variants of gTLDs will be delegated ... until appropriate variant management solutions are developed."

Subsequent work by ICANN organization and the community led to the identification of two issues: (i) there is no accepted definition for variant TLDs, and (ii) there is no 'variant management' mechanism for TLDs.

For the first issue, the Root Zone Label Generation Rules (RZ-LGR) Procedure was developed with the support of the community and adopted by the ICANN Board on 11 April 2013 for implementation. The Procedure has been implemented and RZ-LGR has been developed for six scripts, and other scripts are being added as their proposals are finalized by the relevant script communities.

For the second issue, ICANN organization has undertaken a detailed examination to propose a set of recommendations for variant management mechanisms for TLDs, which will be finalized based on the community input. The finalized recommendations will be presented to the ICANN Board, anticipated in March 2019. At that time, the ICANN Board will be requested to consider these recommendations to allow for implementing IDN variant TLDs.

Link: https://www.icann.org/public-comments/managing-idn-variant-tlds-2018-07-25-en

ICANN Announces Calls-to-Action for Community Participation in ICANN Reviews

LOS ANGELES – 23 July 2018 – The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has several calls-to-action for community participation in ICANN reviews below.

REVIEWS:

Share your Public Comment on the Short-Term and Long-Term Options to Adjust the Timing of Reviews. ICANN has received input from the community that the current review schedule is placing strain on community resources. Following community input, ICANN published Short-Term and Long-Term options to adjust the timing of reviews for public comment. The extended close date for public comment is 31 July 2018 at 23:59 UTC.

SPECIFIC REVIEWS:

Join the Registration Directory Service Review (RDS-WHOIS2) Review Team for its 26-27 July face-to-face meeting. The review team will review the recent work of its subgroups and work to reach consensus on findings and recommendations for incorporation into its draft report. Click here to learn how to attend in person or remotely.

ORGANIZATIONAL REVIEWS:

View the Final Report of the second Root Server System Advisory Committee Review (RSSAC2). The RSSAC2 Final Report [PDF, 2.58 MB] includes an assessment of the RSSAC with eight principal findings and six principal recommendations for improving its operations with a focus on RSSAC's purpose, effectiveness, and accountability.

Visit the Review Status Update Table for the latest status on all active Specific and Organizational Reviews.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address into your computer or other device – a name or a number. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation and a community with participants from all over the world.

Methodology Review of the Domain Abuse Activity Reporting (DAAR) System

LOS ANGELES – 20 July 2018 – Today, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced the publication of a paper describing the methodology used in the Domain Abuse Activity Reporting (DAAR) system and two reviews of that methodology.

DAAR was designed to provide the ICANN community with a reliable, persistent, and reproducible data from which security threat (abuse) analyses could be performed.

The experts selected for the review of the DAAR methodology are respected members of operational security, cybersecurity, and academic communities:

  • Marcus Ranum is a renowned security expert. He is arguably the inventor of the modern Internet firewall and network intrusion detection system. Through his capacities as chief executive, chief technology, and chief security officer, security auditor or consultant, Ranum has accumulated extensive experience with collecting and processing threat data.
  • John Bambenek is a consultant, Vice President of Security Research and Intelligence at ThreatSTOP, and a Lecturer at the University of Illinois. John has produced and developed open-source threat intelligence feeds for algorithmically generated domain names (DGA) and malware. In his role at University of Illinois, Bambenek is directing a graduate team project to analyze TLD registries, registrars, and hosting providers using a methodology similar to DAAR.

Links to the report and reviews:

The DAAR project has produced a system for studying and reporting domain name registration and security threat (domain abuse) behavior across top-level domain (TLD) registries and registrars. The overarching purpose of DAAR is to report security threat activity as it is experienced in network operations to the ICANN community, which can then use the data to facilitate informed policy decisions.

To inform the community of the DAAR project design objectives and the ways by which those objectives have been met, the ICANN organization has prepared a methodology white paper. The paper explains the purposes of the DAAR project and gives an overview of the system, describes the security threats that DAAR observes, and how DAAR compiles threat data from high-confidence threat reputation data feeds.

To foster confidence in the DAAR system, the ICANN org has engaged two independent experts to review the methodology paper, to comment on the threat data that DAAR consumes, and to experiment with the reporting system. The purpose of these reviews is to have experts in the field validate the methodology, attest to the reproducibility of DAAR's findings and reporting, and to attest to the quality and reliability of the reputation data that the ICANN org has chosen to use for this project.

We welcome your comments on the reports and reviews. Please send them to daar@icann.org, by 24 August 2018. The findings and recommendations from the reviewers and parties who comment will be considered in the final drafting of the methodology paper.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

ICANN Request to Preserve WHOIS Data Referred to German Appeal Court

LOS ANGELES – 19 July 2018 – The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) was informed yesterday that the Regional Court in Bonn, Germany, has decided to refer to the Higher Regional Court in Cologne, Germany, the injunction proceedings ICANN initiated against EPAG, a Germany-based, ICANN-accredited registrar that is part of the Tucows Group. ICANN filed the injunction proceedings seeking assistance in interpreting the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in order to protect the data collected in WHOIS.

In its initial ruling, the Regional Court determined that it would not issue an injunction against EPAG. ICANN appealed this decision. Upon receipt of the appeal, the Regional Court exercised its option to re-evaluate its decision instead of immediately forwarding the matter to the Higher Regional Court to address the appeal.

In referring the matter to the Higher Regional Court in Cologne, the Regional Court did not change its original determination not to issue an injunction against EPAG. The Regional Court also rejected the alternative claims submitted by EPAG in recent court filings. Notably, the Regional Court issued this second ruling without consideration of the additional court filings submitted earlier this week by ICANN and ICANN's Intellectual Property Constituency. Those filings will be part of the record to be transferred to the Higher Regional Court for the appeal.

ICANN will continue to pursue this matter as part of its public interest role in coordinating a decentralized global WHOIS for the generic top-level domain system. ICANN awaits further direction from the Higher Regional Court on next steps, which could include referring the matter to the European Court of Justice, issuing a decision based upon the papers already submitted, requesting additional briefings or scheduling a hearing with the parties.

Background:

On 25 May 2018, ICANN filed the injunction proceedings against EPAG. ICANN asked the Court for assistance in interpreting the GDPR in an effort to protect the data collected in WHOIS. ICANN sought a court ruling to ensure the continued collection of all WHOIS data. The intent was to assure that all such data remains available to parties that demonstrate a legitimate purpose to access it, and to seek clarification that under the GDPR, ICANN may continue to require such collection.

ICANN filed the proceedings because EPAG had informed ICANN that as of 25 May 2018, it would no longer collect administrative and technical contact information when it sells new domain name registrations. EPAG believes collection of that particular data would violate the GDPR. ICANN's contract with EPAG requires that information to be collected.

EPAG is one of over 2,500 registrars and registries that help ICANN maintain the global information resource of the WHOIS system. ICANN is not seeking to have its contracted parties violate the law. Put simply, EPAG's position spotlights a disagreement with ICANN and others as to how the GDPR should be interpreted.

On 30 May 2018, the Regional Court determined that it would not issue an injunction against EPAG. In rejecting the injunctive relief, the Court ruled that it would not require EPAG to collect the administrative and technical data for new registrations. However, the Court did not indicate in its ruling that collecting such data would be a violation of the GDPR. Rather, the Court said that the collection of the domain name registrant data should suffice in order to safeguard against misuse in connection with the domain name (such as criminal activity, infringement, or security problems).

The Court reasoned that because it is possible for a registrant to provide the same data elements for the registrant as for the administrative and technical contacts, ICANN did not demonstrate that it is necessary to collect additional data elements for those contacts. The Court also noted that a registrant could consent and provide administrative and technical contact data at its discretion.

On 13 June 2018, ICANN appealed the Regional Court's ruling to the Higher Regional Court of Cologne, Germany, and again asked for an injunction that would require EPAG to reinstate the collection of all WHOIS data required under EPAG's Registrar Accreditation Agreement with ICANN.

In addition to the court proceedings, ICANN is continuing to pursue ongoing discussions with the European Commission and the European Data Protection Board to gain further clarification of the GDPR as it relates to the integrity of WHOIS services.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

GNSO Council Launches EPDP on the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data

It is an honor to announce that the Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) Council has just officially launched an Expedited Policy Development Process (EPDP) on the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data. During our July Council meeting held today at 12:00UTC, the GNSO Council passed the Initiation Request [PDF, 390 KB] of the Expedited Policy Development Process (EPDP) on the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data and adopted the EPDP Team Charter [PDF, 523 KB]. Both documents are the product of several months of preparatory work on the part of the Council, acting as the Charter and Initiation Request Drafting Team. This important milestone marks the official commencement of the GNSO's very first Expedited PDP. As the name suggests, an EPDP is a Policy Development Process in which the early steps of Preliminary Issue Report and Final Issue Report (and associated public comment periods) are eliminated to fast-track policy development in cases of urgency. The GNSO Council has agreed that the EPDP is the most appropriate response to the ICANN Board's adoption of the proposed Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data. It facilitates meeting the unique time constraints presented by the Temporary Specification, as described in detail in the Background Information section below.

Since the Board's adoption of the Temporary Specification on 17 May 2018, the GNSO Council, as Bylaws-mandated manager of the policy development process, has been working hard in preparation for the launch of this EPDP. During an extraordinary meeting on 12 June 2018, the GNSO Council agreed to form a Drafting Team, consisting of Council leadership and interested Council members. Over the next several weeks, including many face-to-face hours at ICANN62 in Panama and many hours of teleconferences in the weeks following ICANN62, the Drafting Team worked tirelessly to reach an agreement on challenging issues such as membership criteria, composition, leadership, and scope of the policy development effort. Incremental changes identified through the PDP 3.0 – a key 2018 initiative of the GNSO Council aimed at improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the PDP – have informed and guided the Charter drafting process. Ultimately, the EPDP Charter is a testament to the true commitment and diligence of the Drafting Team and GNSO Council.

It is also with great pleasure that we announce the appointment of Kurt Pritz as the Chair of the EPDP. Following rigorous evaluation of the applications received for the role of Chair of the EPDP, a selection panel unanimously recommended Kurt Pritz for this important position. The GNSO Council has agreed that he possesses the unique skill set needed to lead this EPDP. The GNSO Council has also put out a Call for Volunteers for the EPDP Team; it is expected that the Team will be formed and hold its first meeting during the week of 30 July 2018.

This is an achievement that all in the GNSO and the wider ICANN community can be immensely proud of. This milestone could not have been achieved without the dedication, principled compromise, and remarkable efforts of the Drafting Team and GNSO Council members, working in collaboration with their Stakeholder Groups and Constituencies. While the EPDP has put the GNSO in unfamiliar territory, the heartening amount of work accomplished in such a short period has laid the groundwork for the EPDP's success. Please join me in celebrating the GNSO Council's achievement, and the demonstration of Councilors' ability to work together in the true spirit of the multistakeholder model.

We welcome the ICANN community to follow the important work of the EPDP. To learn how to participate as a non-member, you may read our announcement today on icann.org.

Background Information

On 17 May 2018, the ICANN Board adopted the proposed Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data. This was an interim measure to bring existing WHOIS obligations in line with requirements of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation. This has, in turn, triggered the obligation of the GNSO Council to undertake a policy development process to confirm, or not, the Temporary Specification as a Consensus Policy. The EPDP must be completed within 12 months of the implementation effective date (25 May 2018) of the Temporary Specification.

How to Get Involved: Launch of the EPDP on the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data

Launched: Expedited Policy Development Process on Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data | Get involved! | Mailing List, Transcripts, Audio Streams

LOS ANGELES – 19 July 2018 – Today, the Generic Names Supporting Organization (GNSO) Council initiated the Expedited Policy Development Process (EPDP) on the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data. Read the GNSO Chair Heather Forrest's blog for more details.

Unlike other GNSO PDP efforts, which are open for anyone to join, the GNSO Council has decided to limit the membership composition of this EPDP. This decision is primarily based on the need to complete the work in a relatively short timeframe and to resource the effort responsibly. As such, GNSO Stakeholder Groups, the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC), the Country Code Supporting Organization (ccNSO), the At-Large Advisory Committee (ALAC), the Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC), and the Root Server System Advisory Committee (RSSAC) have each been invited to appoint up to a set number of members and alternates, as outlined in the EPDP Team Charter [PDF, 523 KB]. In addition, the ICANN Board and ICANN Org have been invited to assign a limited number of liaisons to this effort.

However, that does not mean that members of the ICANN community cannot be involved if they are not appointed members, alternates or liaisons. One can follow the deliberations of the EPDP Team by signing up as a mailing list observer, follow the meetings via real-time audio cast, and check the recordings and transcripts accessible to the public. Furthermore, the Charter dictates that the EPDP Team should make provisions as part of its work plan to provide regular updates to the ICANN community and others interested, for example, through newsletters and webinars. Moreover, the EPDP Team is required to reach out at an early stage to GNSO Stakeholder Groups and Constituencies as well as other ICANN Supporting Organizations and Advisory Committees to request input. Last but not least, everyone will be invited to comment on the EPDP Team Initial Report once it is published for public comment. Per the EPDP procedures, the EPDP Team is expected to carefully consider and analyze all input received through the public comment forum. Further details on how to get involved are included hereunder. The GNSO Council hope that the ICANN community will make use of these opportunities to closely follow the EPDP Team deliberations!

Mailing List Observers

One can become an observer of the EPDP Team mailing list on a read-only basis. Sign up here: https://goo.gl/forms/iZg5JWHOnERsoEMI2. The names of mailing list observers will also be published on the EPDP wiki space.

Conference Call Audio Cast

While participation on EPDP Team conference calls is restricted to appointed members and liaisons only, non-members are able to listen in real-time via an audio cast. The audio cast will begin streaming a few minutes before the start of each conference call:

Check the EPDP Team conference calls on the GNSO Master Calendar.

Recordings, Transcripts & Materials

All EPDP Team conference calls will be recorded and transcribed. Recordings, transcripts as well as any notes and action items will be made available on the GNSO Master Calendar. In addition, all EPDP related materials, including recordings, transcripts, background documents, and team output, can be found on the EPDP wiki space.

Frequently Asked Questions

ICANN Org has gathered questions received on the EPDP and will continue adding questions to the live Frequently Asked Questions document as they are received.

About EPDP

On 17 May 2018, the ICANN Board adopted the proposed Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data. This is an interim measure to bring existing WHOIS obligations in line with requirements of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation. This also triggered the GNSO Council to undertake a policy development process to confirm, or not, the Temporary Specification as a Consensus Policy within 12 months of its implementation effective date (25 May 2018). The GNSO Council agreed that an EPDP provides the best opportunity to meet this timing requirement. To determine the proposed path forward, a Drafting Team was formed, consisting of Council leadership and interested Council members. The Drafting Team developed an Initiation Request [PDF, 390 KB] for an EPDP and a proposed EPDP Team Charter. During its meeting on Thursday, 19 July 2018, the GNSO Council passed the motion to initiate the EPDP and to adopt the EPDP Team Charter [PDF, 523 KB].

For further information, please email gnso-secs@icann.org.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

Minimal User Impact Expected From Root Zone Key Signing Key (KSK) Rollover

The ICANN organization believes that an update of the Domain Name System Security Extensions (DNSSEC) trust anchor for the global Domain Name System (DNS) on 11 October 2018 will affect only a very small number of DNS users. The decision to roll the root zone Key Signing Key (KSK) is being made after a significant outreach effort and careful consideration of all available data.

Since the DNS root zone was originally signed in 2010, the DNSSEC Practice and Policy Statement1 has set the expectation that the root zone KSK will change. Fortunately, most validating resolvers that observe a new root zone KSK should be able to configure it as a new trust anchor automatically using "Automated Updates of DNS Security (DNSSEC) Trust Anchors," defined in RFC50112. A resolver operator can also update their trust anchor configuration manually if they have become aware that the root KSK is changing based on ICANN's various outreach efforts.

There is no standardized or deterministic way to actively measure that a validating resolver has the correct set of trust anchors configured. The best method currently available is "Signaling Trust Anchor Knowledge in DNS Security Extensions" (documented in RFC 81453) that was published in April 2017. In that protocol, validators emit a DNS query that contains the DNSKEY key IDs of configured trust anchors in the query name. These queries can be passively observed in traffic at the root servers. In September 2017, there were a handful of resolvers using this protocol and the announcements of trust anchors showed a higher percentage of misconfigured trust anchors than initially anticipated. However, the signal observed at the time was not well understood and, as a result, the ICANN org decided to postpone the root zone KSK roll to better understand the signal with the help of the technical community.

Further research by the ICANN org's Office of the CTO (OCTO) team and others revealed concerns with the quality of the RFC 8145 data. For example, a DNS query reporting trust anchor information that is sent to a forwarder is treated the same as any other query and will be sent to a root server regardless if the forwarder is validating or not. In one case, a popular DNS resolver implementation signaled the trust anchor even though the resolver was not configured to validate and thus would not have the new trust anchor. This implementation decision was reversed in a subsequent release of the software. In another case, a well-known DNS resolver library signaled the trust anchor but did not have a method to automatically update its trust anchor configuration. As a result, a single deployment of a popular single-user VPN implementation using that DNS resolver library would emit the old trust anchor signal from different source addresses over time. Wes Hardaker at the University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute discovered this behavior and the vendor using the library was informed and updated their software. This change has significantly reduced the number of sources reporting the old trust anchor.4

However, the RFC 8145 data reports only resolvers; it does not provide an indication of the number of end users dependent upon those resolvers. To understand the size of the population of users behind validating resolvers, the Regional Internet Registry for the Asia Pacific region (APNIC) used a measurement system that utilizes Google's advertising network to query the DNS. Analyzing the intersection of ICANN's trust anchor signaling sources with their own resolver sources and then extrapolating, APNIC calculated that only 0.05 percent of Internet users would be negatively affected by the root KSK roll.5

Looking forward, the ICANN org will soon reach out to the 1,000 Internet Service Providers (ISPs) with the most active resolver traffic that suggests DNSSEC validation has been enabled in order to ensure they aware that the root KSK roll will occur on 11 October 2018. Those ISPs will also be surveyed on their preparation plans for the rollover, which may cause those resolver operators to become more aware of the KSK rollover.

Since the first announcement of the development of plans to roll the trust anchor in 2015, the ICANN org has maintained an outreach campaign that has (to date) included nearly 100 speaking engagements at international, regional, and national conferences, and more than 150 news stories in the technical press. The ICANN org has also published nine blog articles related to the trust anchor rollover and continues to reach out to the ISPs that have validating resolvers in their networks but which, from RFC 8145 data, do not appear to have the new trust anchor configured.

As a result of these efforts and the data we have been able to collect, the ICANN org has increased confidence that the root KSK rollover planned for 11 October 2018 will have the potential to affect only a tiny fraction of DNS users.


1 https://www.iana.org/dnssec/icann-dps.txt

2 https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/rfc5011/

3 https://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/rfc8145/

4 http://root-trust-anchor-reports.research.icann.org/

5 http://www.potaroo.net/ispcol/2018-04/ksk.pdf [PDF, 184 KB]

A Review of Our FY18 Middle East Journey

The year was filled with accomplishments as well as challenges for ICANN in the Middle East. As we build upon our accomplishments and learn from the challenges, we take this opportunity to present a report on our regional activities. But before doing so, we'd like to thank each of our community members in the Middle East for their tireless efforts and collaboration, leading us to where we are now, with a bright future of ICANN activities in the region.

The report is built upon ICANN's Middle East Global Stakeholder Engagement (GSE) team activities in FY18, with a focus on building capacity and raising awareness around ICANN and the wider Internet ecosystem. The report highlights include:

  • Regional participation rates at ICANN Public Meetings
  • Regional events, webinars, and workshops
  • Academic engagements
  • Regional studies
  • Community feedback

The report also includes ICANN regional community member and participant surveys to assess the efficiency of our efforts in the region. Among them is a survey on ICANN's FY18 Middle East Engagement. To see the results of this survey, click here [PDF, 878 KB].

You can review the full report here [PDF, 111 KB], and contact us at meac.swg@icann.org for feedback or questions.

Engagement and Outreach
Media Coverage In Numbers
Root Server Instances Operated by ICANN
Regional Webinars
Regional Events

2018 Nominating Committee Update on Candidate Selections

LOS ANGELES – 17 July 2018 – The 2018 Nominating Committee (NomCom) is pleased to announce that the selection of all 2018 open ICANN leadership positions was finalized by the Committee at ICANN62 in Panama City, Panama. The selections for the three ICANN Board positions were decided unanimously. The ICANN organization has sent out communications to the successful candidates and any alternates, as well as to those who made it to the final round but were not selected this year. The NomCom plans to make a public announcement of the successful candidates in August 2018.

The 2018 NomCom would like to thank the Board, Advisory Committees, Supporting Organizations, stakeholder groups, and constituencies for their support with outreach and recruitment, as well as their assistance in outlining requested criteria for the open positions. The NomCom encourages the ICANN community to continue its assistance in recruiting candidates for the 2019 NomCom.

For more information on the 2018 NomCom, including timeline and work phases, please visit https://www.icann.org/nomcom2018.

Successful Candidates Announced for ICANN63 Fellowship

LOS ANGELES – 16 July 2018 - The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) organization is pleased to announce the 45 individuals from 39 countries that have been selected to participate in the ICANN Fellowship Program at ICANN63 Annual General in Barcelona, Spain, from 20-25 October 2018.

The successful candidates represent all sectors of society including, civil, government, ccTLD operations, academia, business community, technical, security, and end user groups.

The Fellowship Program seeks out individuals who are interested in, or already engaged in, the various aspects of ICANN's work in policy building, the operation of the Domain Name System, and the security and stability of the global Internet. The goal of the program is to help create a broader and more diverse base of knowledgeable constituents. Priority is given to candidates currently living in underserved and underrepresented communities around the world, representing diversity of gender, sector, region, experience, expertise, and financial need. The ICANN org received a total of 471 applications for the ICANN63 Fellowship Program.

Click this link to see the list of selected candidates and to learn more about the Fellowship Program.

About ICANN

ICANN’s mission is to help ensure a stable, secure, and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

Enforcing the Temporary Specification

In May, the ICANN Board adopted the Temporary Specification for gTLD Registration Data, modifying our agreements with registries and registrars to comply with the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Since then, ICANN Contractual Compliance has received a number of questions regarding how we would enforce these new provisions. The purpose of this blog is to describe our approach to enforcing the Temporary Specification, explain how to file complaints about potential violations of the new provisions, and share information on some of the issues we have seen so far.

As noted at the Global Domains Division (GDD) Industry Summit in May and at the ICANN62 Policy Forum in June, ICANN Contractual Compliance is enforcing the requirements of the Temporary Specification as of 25 May 2018, as it does any other ICANN agreement or policy requirement. This is done through the Contractual Compliance function, which employs the same approach and process for all enforcement areas. Details regarding this approach and process can be found here.

All contracted parties are advised to review the Temporary Specification carefully. Many of the requirements apply even if the registry or registrar is not in the European Union and has no registrations from the European Economic Area. Enforcement of the Temporary Specification applies to all ICANN contracted parties. For a high level review of the Temporary Specification, ICANN also published and regularly updates a Frequently Asked Questions document.

One recurring concern we have received is how ICANN Contractual Compliance will obtain non-public registration data that is required to process a complaint. Among the complaints received to date, ICANN Contractual Compliance has received two alleging denial of access to non-public registration data for legitimate purposes. Most of the other complaints received concern the availability of data published in WHOIS. For registrars, some of the registration data issues include:

  • Over-redacting public registration data, e.g.:
    • All contact fields are redacted when only some should be;
    • Missing Administrative/Technical email field and/or value;
    • Missing Registrant Organization/State/Province/Country field and/or value; and
    • Redacting privacy/proxy information
  • Non-compliant redacted fields e.g., missing anonymized email and/or webform to contact Registrant/Admin/Tech contact or using non-compliant values in the field for ex. "00000"
  • Registrar appears to be using registry WHOIS data causing endless loop of referral from registry to registrar data
  • Transfer requests being denied due to non-functional anonymized email address for registrant

Some of the registry issues include:

  • Missing required Registrant/Admin/Tech Email (requirement for registries)
  • Required Registrant/Admin/Tech Email message in legal disclaimer only
  • Not providing full registration data to the Uniform Rapid Suspension System (URS) provider
  • Registry providing thick Bulk Registration Data Access (BRDA) files to ICANN instead of thin data

We have also received a number of questions regarding the process for filing complaints alleging noncompliance with the Temporary Specification. As many have observed, there is not a "Temporary Specification" complaint form. To file a complaint about potential violations of the Temporary Specification or any other part of the agreements, please use the most relevant form published on the ICANN.org compliance page. ICANN Contractual Compliance will process complaints regardless of the form used.

I hope this information is helpful. If you have any other questions or concerns regarding enforcement of the Temporary Specification, please let us know by emailing either the Contractual Compliance department at compliance@icann.org or me at Jamie.hedlund@icann.org.

ICANN Board of Directors Submits Comments Regarding NTIA’s Notice of Inquiry on International Internet Policy Priorities

LOS ANGELES – 13 July 2018 – The Board of Directors of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) submitted comments [PDF, 320 KB] today in response to the United States Department of Commerce National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) Notice of Inquiry (NOI) on International Internet Policy Priorities.

In its comments, ICANN's Board of Directors highlighted the success of the multistakeholder model and enhancements made to the organization's accountability mechanisms during the IANA stewardship transition. The comments also pointed to the high customer satisfaction levels delivered by the operator of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions, Public Technical Identifiers (PTI).

For more information about the NTIA's NOI, please visit https://www.ntia.doc.gov/federal-register-notice/2018/notice-inquiry-international-internet-policy-priorities.

About ICANN

ICANN's mission is to help ensure a stable, secure and unified global Internet. To reach another person on the Internet, you need to type an address – a name or a number – into your computer or other device. That address must be unique so computers know where to find each other. ICANN helps coordinate and support these unique identifiers across the world. ICANN was formed in 1998 as a not-for-profit public-benefit corporation with a community of participants from all over the world.

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